‘Maker Faire’ Bigger and Better

Front Page / Sep. 28, 2017 9:13am EDT

OCTOBER 7: A BUSY DAY IN RANDOLPH

“Creativity is intelligence having fun.” (Einstein)

The Randolph Area Community Development Corporation (RACDC) will host the second annual Randolph “Mini Maker Faire” October 7, from noon-5 p.m. at 2 South Main Street in downtown Randolph.

The event will again be free and open, thanks to sponsorship from Catamount Solar, LEDdynamics, WCVR radio, and the support of RACDC members.

This year, the Maker Faire will also include a street fair on Merchants Row with demonstrators, food vendors and live music.

Local radio station WCVR will broadcast live from Merchants Row.

To date, 23 demonstrators have been signed up, many of them offering interactive displays, according to Crystal Hand, an intern with RACDC who is helping to organize the event.

Sounds Like Fun!

For instance, visitors can don virtual reality goggles and learn to pilot a drone. Children can learn to make “scribble-bots” from everyday materials and a tiny computer chip, or they can create original designs with the Arts Bus.

Laser-cutting tools, lighting, 3-D printing, welding, the Internet of Things, and gemology are just a few of the other demonstrations that will fill the hall and street.

This year, Efficiency Vermont will also sponsor two demonstrations: one about the Vermod “net zero” home, and the other about energy-saving products.

Anyone interested in learning more about converting their inventions and ideas into business opportunities will have a chance to discuss business development with lenders and business experts who will be on hand to answer questions and share resources.

RACDC hosts the Maker Faire to highlight the growing importance of technology and innovation to the local economy, and also to offer career opportunities for people of all ages.

From the earliest days, innovation was essential to survive and thrive in Vermont. It is no less true today, although the tool set is expanding.

Randolph’s Contribution

In the 18th century, Randolph was a leader in the design and manufacture of agricultural implements and in the 19th century, a Randolph farmer created a new horse lineage, the Morgan Horse. In the 20th century, Vermont Castings led the movement toward efficient residential wood stoves; and in the 21st century, local industries are innovating with LED lighting, robotics, food. and fiber.

“RACDC sees this Maker’s Faire as an opportunity to showcase this kind of work to the community, and especially to expose young people to the creative work going on around us and the world of opportunities open to them,” said RACDC’s Julie Iffland.

Makers can sign up to demonstrate until September 30 by filling out an application at randolphmakerfaire.com.

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