Main Street Storefront Now Alive with Artwork

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Communities / Sep. 28, 2017 9:13am EDT

By M. D. Drysdale


Randolph artist Rachi Farrow has staked out the former Art of Vermont Gallery space on Main Street for display of her extensive work. (Herald / Bob Eddy) Randolph artist Rachi Farrow has staked out the former Art of Vermont Gallery space on Main Street for display of her extensive work. (Herald / Bob Eddy) Walkers along Main Street in Randolph this week were surprised (and delighted) to see what appeared to be a brand new store created over the weekend in the building which most recently housed the Art of Vermont.

The windows were full of colorful artwork, and those peering inside could see a wild variety of sculptures and paintings.

Until last weekend, the storefront had been dark and gloomy for a year. Now it is colorful, exciting, and quirky.

The transition came about thanks to Rachi and John Farrow of Randolph Center, and it’s their salute to the importance of a viable downtown.

“John dreamed it up two weeks ago,” Rachi explained. “It was something we could do for Randolph.”

They brought their idea to Annie Lu, who owns the three-story building, and she leased them the downstairs for a year at a favorable price, they said.

With a little help, the couple then worked all weekend to bring carloads of artwork from Rachi’s home studio to the Main Street store.

“It was an enormous project, but I’m happy about it,” said Rachi, who over the years has created hundreds of works of art—always made from recyclable materials.

What Now?

Although the storefront now looks like a store, it’s really not one. Not yet, anyway. The space generally will not be open to the public, except on rare occasions.

The general idea is to “keep it (the storefront) bright and keep it fun.” Those who would like to tour the facility with the thought of buying some of the artwork will be able to get access by using the telephone number on the window.

Rachi began creating art (in earnest) around 1980 and has kept at it.

“I’ve got a lot of stuff,” she allowed.

The couple was still bringing in pieces Monday night, and she figured they still were only about half done.

She was surprised at how much room the Main Street space provided.

“We were just about dead” after the previous night’s work, Rachi said. “This place is huge!”

Rachi said it might be possible to open the store on occasion next summer. In the meantime, a telephone number on the window can be used to arrange entrée to anyone seriously interested in bidding on a piece of art.

Another sign on the same window summarizes the reason the Farrows have created this project.

“Main Street Matters,” reads the sign. Next to the words is a raised fist.

“I’m not going to change the world,” Rachi reflected this week. “But I WILL give it my opinion.”

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