Lifelong Interest Has Become Lifetime Endeavor for Remy Lary

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People / Aug. 6, 2009 12:00am EDT

By Martha Slater

Lifelong Interest Has Become Lifetime Endeavor for Remy Lary By Martha Slater

Remy Lary focuses on painting the talons on his most recent project, a carving of a northern saw-whet owl. (Herald / Zach Nelson)Remy Lary focuses on painting the talons on his most recent project, a carving of a northern saw-whet owl. (Herald / Zach Nelson)

Remy Lary of Buttles Road in Hancock will share his love of birds and expertise at bird carving at the White River Valley Historical Fair at Whitcomb High School in Bethel Saturday, Aug. 15. In addition to demonstrating bird carving and wood burning, he will be working on a bluebird, and will display several finished pieces.

Birds themselves have been a lifelong interest for Lary. Before he started carving, he belonged to the VINS-sponsored Twin State Tanagers, which won first place in 1999 and 2000, counting the most species during a 24-hour period in the world series of birding held in Cape May, N.J. In 2001, he traveled to Costa Rica with a group studying biodiversity in the rain forest.

Now 25, Lary started carving birds about four years ago, under the mentorship of renowned world champion bird carver Floyd Scholz, who also happens to have a home in Hancock.

“I’ve always had an artistic side,” Lary explained, “and it all just clicked one day for me and I decided to give it a try. I took my first carving class with Floyd in 2004 and wanted to take it a step further and see where it went. Since then, I’ve been laying down the blueprint and honing my skills, and for the past couple of years, I’ve been really busy.”

In 2005 and 2006, he competed in the novice category at the Ward World Carving Competition in Ocean City, Md., the same event that Scholz has won championships at in the past. He has done several commission pieces, mostly for private collectors.

“Things are starting to get pretty serious now,” Lary said. “It’s transitioning from a hobby to a lifetime endeavor.”

He uses electronic carving tools and a sanding machine, and notes that a small owl, for example, will take him about three weeks to complete, working eight-hour days.

“When I’m doing a commission, I do what the person wants, but when I’m doing one for myself, it’s mostly songbirds and birds of prey, or another bird that interests me at the time.”

Laid off from his regular job several months ago, Lary is spending a lot of time working on his bird carving. He is currently finishing up a carving of a northern saw-whet owl that will be on display at the Village Porch restaurant on Main Street in Rochester later on this summer.

Anyone who would like more information about Lary’s carving is welcome to call him at 767-3605.

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