Leahy Brings Contract

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Front Page / Mar. 22, 2006 11:00pm EST

Of $4.2 Million to ARA
By M. D. Drysdale


Leahy Brings Contract


U. S. Sen Patrick Leahy helped a group of company officials cut the ribbon yesterday at the Randolph grand opening of Vertek, a division of Applied Research Associates. Pictured are, from left: ARA CEO Rob Seus, Vertek Division Manager David Timian, Sen. Leahy, Sector Manager Jim Shinn of the Royalton office, and assistant Division Manager Laurie McIntosh. (Herald photo / Bob Eddy)U. S. Sen Patrick Leahy helped a group of company officials cut the ribbon yesterday at the Randolph grand opening of Vertek, a division of Applied Research Associates. Pictured are, from left: ARA CEO Rob Seus, Vertek Division Manager David Timian, Sen. Leahy, Sector Manager Jim Shinn of the Royalton office, and assistant Division Manager Laurie McIntosh. (Herald photo / Bob Eddy)

Of $4.2 Million to ARA

By M. D. Drysdale

As promised, U. S. Sen. Patrick Leahy showed up for the grand opening of Applied Research Associates' new manufacturing building in Randolph yesterday. The opening also attracted many members of the public, who got a tour through the 67,000-square-foot building, the former home of Waterbury Co.

What the public didn't know, however, is that Sen. Leahy came bearing a new government contract for the Randolph and Royalton divisions of ARA. The Senator announced a contract to ARA for $4.2 million to continue working on detection of land mines.

The clean-up of the millions of land mines around the world has been a priority for Vermont's Senator for many years—and ARA has become a worldwide leader in using robots to detonate the deadly devices. The military has bought numbers of the life-saving robots for $200,000 to $300,000 apiece.

According to Leahy's office, this grant of $4.2 million brings to $18 million the amount of contract money that Leahy has steered to the Vermont company.

Jim Shinn, sector manager of ARA, expressed the company's gratitude to the Senator for the new contract. He told The Herald that the contract will help ARA move past designing machines that simply can detonate land mines to devices that can detect them—a much more difficult task.

Modern land mines, he explained, are mostly made of plastic, look like gravel or a rock, and contain only a "very, very small" piece of metal as a striker.

The new grant is largely a research grant to develop and build devices that can detect land mines, Shinn said. The work will be carried out both in Royalton and in the Vertek Division, which has just moved to the Randolph manufacturing plant.

It will mean "a few more jobs" for people with M.S. and PhD degrees and jobs also for technicians, Shinn said.


Grand Opening Held

Leahy Brings $4.2M Contract

As promised, U. S. Sen. Patrick Leahy showed up for the grand opening of Applied Research Associates' new manufacturing building in Randolph yesterday. The opening also attracted many members of the public, who got a tour through the 67,000-square-foot building, the former home of Waterbury Co.

What the public didn't know, however, is that Sen. Leahy came bearing a new government contract for the Randolph and Royalton divisions of ARA. The Senator announced a contract to ARA for $4.2 million to continue working on detection of land mines.

The clean-up of the millions of land mines around the world has been a priority for Vermont's Senator for many years—and ARA has become a worldwide leader in using robots to detonate the deadly devices. The military has bought numbers of the life-saving robots for $200,000 to $300,000 apiece.

According to Leahy's office, this grant of $4.2 million brings to $18 million the amount of contract money that Leahy has steered to the Vermont company.

Jim Shinn, sector manager of ARA, expressed the company's gratitude to the Senator for the new contract. He told The Herald that the contract will help ARA move past designing machines that simply can detonate land mines to devices that can detect them—a much more difficult task.

Modern land mines, he explained, are mostly made of plastic, look like gravel or a rock, and contain only a "very, very small" piece of metal as a striker.

The new grant is largely a research grant to develop and build devices that can detect land mines, Shinn said. The work will be carried out both in Royalton and in the Vertek Division, which has just moved to the Randolph manufacturing plant.

It will mean "a few more jobs" for people with M.S. and PhD degrees and jobs also for technicians, Shinn said.


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